We have some catching up to do….

So it’s been three months since my last post and what a three months it’s been!

As always I started out with the very best of intentions to keep you updated with progress on my concave (egg) chair but by the time I returned to Tresithick for my final week of tuition, the deadline for my written research project was looming and I’d done my usual trick of leaving everything to the last moment!! Needless to say, rather than showing you lovely people gorgeous pictures of my chair, I was hurriedly pulling together a bibliography, referencing photos and attempting to print a sizeable 19,000 word piece on the ‘History of 20th Century Furniture Design’. I did it……… but the printer nearly went out of the window.

I should add that despite my self-induced stress the written research project was actually a really enjoyable thing to do – the sheer quantity of written work wasn’t actually a requirement but instead it was a result of how much I was learning. I felt sorry for Richard who had to plough through it!

So we have a lot to catch up on don’t we? The chairs, the assessment and a few other things that I’m not sure I can share with you just yet…..

The egg chair continued to be a joy to work on although I wouldn’t want to give the impression that it was a walk in the park. Once you’ve created your tailored cover for the shell, you’ve got to fit it – and this is the tricky part. Imagine trying to put a coat on a child who under no circumstances wishes to wear a coat. It was about that easy. Naturally you want to create a cover for the shell that is as fitted as possible, but as you have ‘wings’ at the top of the chair you’ve somehow got to stretch the cover beyond the point you fitted it in order to settle it into place.

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The shell with its new tailored cover. What you can’t see is me in a little crumpled heap of exhaustion behind the camera.

This is where having a fabric with stretch is essential, the last thing you want to hear is the sound of ripping fabric as you’re wrestling the cover into place. I’d love to do another of these chairs, but if you ask me to do it in anything other than super-stretchy wool you’re definitely off my Christmas card list.

With the shell fabric wrestled into place it was time to tackle the inside cushions. bring on the teal! It’s not always easy to tell from samples exactly how a colour combination will work, but boy was I pleased with this one. My confidence was also boosted by the lovely comments from my colleagues in the work room who seemed to fall for these colours in the same way that I did.

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Each cushion had to be carefully tailored to fit the space
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Final button positions and colour took a little while to decide

New cushions were made to replace the bio-hazard originals (which had a final flourish as padding to protect fellow student, Josie’s mammoth leather armchair as she worked on it) and the covers were again, tailored to fit. The big decision that remained was that of buttons. To match or to contrast? With a short discussion in the work room, matching was a clear winner – a more sophisticated design decision we all thought.

With my final week at Tresithick drawing to a close it was clear that I would still have a little work to do on both of my Diploma chairs to get them ready for final assessment and verification in May. The good news was that the remaining jobs were easily achieved back in my own workshop and both chairs were ready in time.

Returning to Cornwall for verification felt a little odd. This was the first occasion that I’d spent time down there without having a project to work on, not that it was too much of a bind to while a way a few days in sunny Cornwall of course.

The other odd feeling was that this felt like a bit of an end of an era. I’ve been coming to Tresithick for 6 years now and it feels like a part of my world, not just a course I decided to take. Richard has been the most inspirational, patient, generous and supportive teacher and mentor that I could have wished for.  The confidence that he has given me has been phenomenal. It’s hard to describe the atmosphere in the workshop at Tresithick without using the words fun, laughter, energy and inspiration – it really struck me as all of the Diploma candidates joined for a celebratory dinner that I’ve made some brilliant friends over the last 6 years (you know who you are!) and that certainly includes Richard, Sonja, Zoe and Bella the dog.

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The last 6 years has flown by and I enjoyed every week at Tresithick as much as my first back in 2011

The achievement of my level 3 Diploma means that there are no more levels for me to achieve and strictly speaking, no need for me to return to Tresithick. I’ve decided not to accept that. There’s always something new to learn, right?

Oh, and the good news is……. I passed! 86% no less, almost a distinction and much more than I had hoped for. Officially chuffed.

So here are the finished pieces – what do you think?

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The Victorain Nursing Chair – Day 9 & 10

There’s nothing like trying to build a bit of suspense ….. And this really was nothing like it. I went to see Spectre las night hence the lack of update! You didn’t notice? Rude.

So that’s it, chair school is over until next year and I’m please to say that the Victorian Nursing chair is finished. Almost.

Remember the problems I was having with the buttons? Well unfortunately the same applied to the piping that I want to use to trim the chair, so I need to source another complimentary fabric to complete the job. A lack of piping means that I can’t put on the back panel yet as the piping needs to be set in place first.

I’ll have to finish this in the new year

Of course this is only a minor setback when you look at the amount I’ve covered in 10 days. These 2 weeks, as ever, have taught me so much. Every time I come to Tresithick I find that I’ve retained more and more from my last visit so that I’m ready to take on another layer of information. I’ve picked up some great tips on shaping, pattern matching and springing this time and I feel like I want to dive straight into another traditional project to put them to good use.

The seat fabric went on pretty easily as the shape is already set by the calico beneath. It really was great to see the final fabric on the seat for the first time, especially against the back of the chair. Great care was taken to ensure that the pattern was matched so that the chair ‘reads’ properly from top to bottom.

So here it is, the big reveal – the House of Hackney x William Morris nursing chair complete with dark green leather buttons. What do you think?

The House of Hackney fabric has real impact!

 

Dark green leather saved the day

Darren and I have had such a great time in Cornwall again, and I know we’ll be sad to drive away tomorrow. But hey, we get to come back again next year, maybe for 3 or 4 weeks – I’ll share more about that soon. A big thanks also goes to everyone who has been following my progress these past 10 days and for the lovely, encouraging comments. They’ve made me even more enthusiastic about this project.

If you’re going to do your upholstery training somewhere, you may as well be somewhere as beautiful as this

The last word has to go to Bella, Richard and Sonja’s dog. I’m going to miss tug of war every break time. I got this photo by holding my biscuit behind the camera. I then ate it. Is that cruel?

give me that biscuit or play with me. Your choice.

The third day

As a child, whenever we went away on holiday as a family the final day was always the most painful for me, as invariably I’d had an amazing time and would spend hours crying at the thought of going home. I might give a repeat performance at the end of this week.

I find it really hard to explain how much I get from being down here, but spending time doing something you love with great people who also love the same thing as you is priceless. I can’t wait for my next week here already! I’d better start selling some pieces to pay for it.

So today has been (relatively) more studious, I’ve been in the cutting room on my own for a few hours and Tracy vowed to talk less so that we could all concentrate! It didn’t happen – we all enjoy it too much and are as bad as each other.

As for my footstool, there’s not a huge amount to show today as a lot of my time has been spent checking measurements, pleat positions and pad tension ready for the top cover. I finished securing the calico this morning and it’s produced a really neat looking pad which closely resembles the finished article, however any mistakes at this stage will show up in the final piece so it’s important that every element is technically and aesthetically correct.

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Then another layer of polyester padding goes over the top to enable to final fabric to move more easily into place and soften the feel of the finished item. In lots of ways it feels sad to cover up what’s been achieved so far, but I’m sure it’ll be looking more impressive in no time.

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With this done, I had an afternoon to plan the button positions on my final fabric. Again this is a painstaking, mathematical task with each button position needing to be mapped horizontally, vertically and diagonally against the next. I did consider hurling myself out of the window on a couple of occasions. Taking the time here (however distressing) means that your fabric will pleat perfectly from one button to the next without any ‘bagging’ or even over-tensioning that could put strain on the buttons. As I want this footstool to look stunning, I figured it was time well spent.

I’m keeping the fabric a secret for now (I’ll show you tomorrow!) but I will give you a teaser in the form of my first few buttons. I’ve not decided which colour or pattern to use yet, these were testers so that I could get used to the button covering machine.

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I’m hoping to have some great progress shots to show you tomorrow. Until then…….