Time to reveal my fabric choice!

Today, Richard fixed me with a very ernest look and declared “I think it’s time”. 

Regulated to within an inch of its life

Yesterday was all about the second layer of stuffings for the inside back of the chair. A good layer of hair was fixed in place, regulated (a process of evening out the hair so that it’s a consistent depth and density) and my liner was then added to create the final line and shape. So with the arms and the back both at this stage, it could mean only one thing – it’s time for the top fabric to go on!

All shaped and ready to go

But hang on a minute, why risk putting your fabric in place when you still have no seat? Well it’s all about access – at this stage of the build we still have good access to the wooden rails that will be used as tacking points for the fabric, and the ultimate aim is to create as tight a space between the seat and the back as we can. A great, yawning gap doesn’t look great and if you drop it, you could loose your custard cream. So, if we build the seat now it means that we’ll have a very tight gap for our fabric to squeeze through and partly restricted access to the frame for tacking. Of course, once attached it also means that I’ve got to take very good care of my new fabric. 

So what have I gone for? Well as you may know I’ve talked before about tricky fabrics, those that can make your life as an upholsterer that little bit harder. This can be through the construction of the fabric or a pattern that needs careful matching. Unusually for me, I’ve opted for a plain this time, however I thought I’d give myself a hard time by opting for my arch-nemesis, velvet.

Ta-da! Don’t fret, I’m not leaving those flappy bits on the corners

I’ve been really inspired of late by the current fashion for velvet, it just looks so sumptuous and tactile! I’m also loving the shades of blues and greens that seem to be popping up regularly in my favourite interiors magazines. The fact that velvet can be tricky to handle and easily marked seemed to diminish as I envisaged how this chair might look. And so the first panel goes on…… What do you think?

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The House of Hackney Chair is Finished!

With the busy Christmas period well and truly out of the way (not that it wasn’t lovely of course) I made a bee-line for the House of Hackney chair which had been waiting patiently in my studio for its finishing touches.

You may recall that the piping fabric was causing the hold-up as the House of Hackney velvet revealed the white cotton backing when wrapped around the cord. Thankfully a trip to my local fabric store solved the issue and I was able to find a really good match in a plain black, short pile velvet printed on a black cotton base. Perfect!

With the right fabric sourced I made the single piping for the back of the chair and attached this directly to the frame so that I could stitch the back panel directly to it so that it gave a nice tight close. The bottom edge was tacked off underneath.

 Then I made up 2 lots of double piping to cover the tacks around the back rest and the bottom edge of the seat. This was glued into place. Now, I don’t know if it’s just my glue gun, but they are pretty hard to use. It seems that mine really is all or nothing, one squeeze and you seem to have endless amounts of hot glue coming out for minutes. How I’m not permanently glued to the chair I will never know. So much concentration was required I actually had to remind myself to breathe.

 

Anyway, with the bottom cloth attached, I was done! And here it is….


  
   
What do you think? I’m really delighted with how it’s turned out, and even more delighted when a visitor to our studio saw the chair and said “that wouldn’t look out of place in House of Hackney’s window” and he didn’t even know it was one of their fabrics!  I did a little imaginary air punch at that moment, not an actual real-life one you understand. I’m way too cool to do that.

So what’s the future of this chair now? As much as i want to keep it, it’s officially up for sale. Interested? Drop me a line!

The Victorian Nursing Chair – Day 8

Short and sweet update today as I’ve been promised fish and chips for dinner! These at is building up nicely and tomorrow I’ll be moving on to the top fabric.

I must admit, I’m not looking forward to fitting the top fabric – the gap between the seat and the back of the chair has closed up pretty tight now, so feeding the fabric through and also finding out where to cut around the frame in such an impossible space is challenging to say the least. It’s one thing to mis-cut with calico but something else when you do it to your luxury top fabric!!

 

Today’s step-by-step transformation

For those of you who have been lying awake at night worrying about my button dilemma, you’ll no doubt be relieved to hear that the green leather has worked a treat and I have my buttons all made and ready to go.

The Victorain Nursing Chair – Day 6

I’ve never done 2 consecutive weeks at ‘Chair School’ before so I wasn’t quite sure how I’d feel starting back today. The fact that I bounced through the door and got straight into it suggests that I’m quite a way off saturation point!

 

Today’s starting point. There’s a whole load of springs in there you know!

I really wanted to feel like I’d made progress today and somehow the time just flew by, leaving me at a place where I felt like I’d achieved very little. If last week is anything to go by I really shouldn’t worry as the next steps are likely to pass in quick succession. As ever, time really needs to be spent on forming the basic shape and structure of the seat pad, after all, everything else rests on these foundations.

 

At this stage I do wonder how I will ever produce something refined!

Today has mostly involved packing almost a kilo of coir into the seat by rolling it tightly into, well, rolls! These are held in place by loops of twine only to be broken up again into something that makes the chair look like it’s having a bad hair day. It’s at this stage you need to think about where you want your coir to be so that you have enough at the edges for your firm stitched border and not so much in the middle that the first person to use the chair will require a seatbelt.

 

Bad hair day?

Once you’re happy, this mass of coir needs to be encapsulated in scrim, and despite the fact that it seems like an impossible task, little by little you adjust the scrim and the coir within to form your basic pad shape.

 

And a few hours later it starts to look like it might just resemble a seat!

So while this is happening there’s been a niggling issue in the background in the form of buttons. It’s my intention and also the norm to add some form of buttoning to the back of the chair. Being concave, it’s not only decorative but also functional in that it helps to accentuate and maintain that lovely ‘spoon back’ appearance. However, there’s an issue.

Regular readers of my blog will know that velvet has caused me issues before, and once again it’s thrown a velvety spanner in the works. I should say that my lovely House of Hackney velvet is in no way faulty, but the nature of velvet means that it won’t always do what you want. Velvet has a pile to it, a bit like a tiny brush – now that’s fine when it’s flat but not so great when you try and wrap it around a tight corner as the pile separates and the cotton backing cloth is revealed. In this case the cotton backing cloth is white and the dyed velvet is much darker, so when you wrap it around a button, the pile separates and the white backing is revealed. Not much good for my top-notch chair!

Over the past week and with the support of my course colleagues I’ve explored lots of options from shocking pink accent buttons (quickly vetoed by numerous people!) to brass coat buttons (which didn’t really look right) and a very experimental ‘colouring in the White bits with a green marker pen’ approach which somehow didn’t feel appropriate!

The offending button complete with white halo ….. and the green leather that might just save the day

Anyway, I think Sonja has come up trumps by finding me a scrap of dark green leather that seems to match pretty well ……. and I think it adds a further edge of opulence 😉 We’re going to give it a go and see how it looks before committing but I’m optimistic. I need to do the buttons so that I can put the back of the chair on!

The Victorian Nursing Chair – Day 5

I think I qualify to become a Boy Scout after today..

 

I’m pretty good at knots now.

The seat has been started and we have springs in place. Again, a process that requires a great deal of though and a great many questions. How high do you want the seat to be? What shape do you want it to have? How firm do you want it to feel? How many springs will fill the space without clashing against each other? needless to say I’ll be seeing knots in my sleep, but I’ll sleep soundly in the knowledge that my springs are well placed and secure!

Think we’re off to St Ives tomorrow and a bit of a coastal walk on Sunday. Can’t wait! More updates on Monday….. Have a great weekend

The Victorian Nursing Chair – Day 4

It may not look like I’ve made all that much progress today, but when your top fabric goes on, it has to be right!

I started today by adding a little wool to the bare edges of the stitched pad and a thin layer of polyester Dacron that helps the fabric to move freely without pulling and rubbing on the pad below. Then came the grand reveal of my House of Hackney x William Morris fabric – so clearly a little time was taken to admire it before I decided where to place my cuts!

A couple of finishing touches to prepare for the top fabric

You really have to think about how you cut fabric with a pattern. It’s not just a case of measuring the area and getting stuck in with your scissors. A couple of questions came my way from Richard, “what feature do you want as the focal point?”, “what part of the pattern do you want to run down the centre?”. Add this to the fact that your seat will also need to match the back and the outside back also needs to mirror the inside back, your cutting plan starts to become a little more complicated. Needless to say, when it comes to expensive fabric, you check your measurements more than once!

 

once I plucked up the courage to make the first cut there was no stopping me!

Working with this luxury velvet was really satisfying and the finished feel was very appealing – my fellow course members just wanted to stroke it. Naturally I checked they’d washed their hands first 😉

Lots and lots of very careful tacking filled the rest of the day before I was satisfied with the tension and position of the pattern. The last step? To take a sharp knife and trim the excess from the edges……. A good time to concentrate.

I think this looks pretty cool – what do you think?

It seems that William Morris is popular this week – I wanted to show you this little beauty completed by my fellow upholsterer, Nikki, today. Isn’t it stunning?

The Victorian Nursing Chair – Day 3

This is so satisfying! I’ve found before when I’m using traditional methods that I reach a point where there’s a real beauty in what you’ve produced, so much so that it seems a crime to cover it up. That’s where I am today.

Still on track, today I’ve added an edge roll (a final row of stitching that ‘pinches’ the leading edge of your pad so that it’s firm and defined) I’ve filled the well with hair, added some soft cotton wadding and covered all of this with calico.

An edge roll completes the stitched pad and gives it a firm, defined edge

 

Lots of hair now fills the well, it’s packed pretty tightly to give enough ‘spring’ when compressed

 

A layer of wool helps to add softness

The calico has been hand-stitched to the edge of the pad as I don’t have oodles of space for tacks on the frame. Plus, with a frame of this age, the more holes you add, the greater the risk of weakness. Using this method has left plenty of room for the top fabric to be tacked, and believe it or not I’ll be doing that tomorrow…. on the back at least.

 

One or two pins are needed for this …….

 

Ladder stitched into place to give an almost undetectable join. even the smallest knots could show through the top fabric

I had homemade pasties for dinner and lunch. Living the dream……..

The Victorian Nursing Chair -Day 2

I feel like I’ve caught up a bit today. I was probably always on track, but when you start to see a chair take shape you can’t help but feel you’re taking a huge stride forwards. I may live to eat those words. Clearly in my excitement I was unable to hold a camera steady, so please accept my apologies for today’s shoddy pictures!

Today has been about shaping using traditional methods, something that I’ve been really keen to learn more about. At the end of yesterday I had a basic platform to work from and my parcel of gathered fabric – so today started with lots and lots of coir! Nice firm edges require a decent amount of stuffing, which through clever stitching and regulating you tame into shape.

 

Let battle commence! This little lot needs to be wresteld into shape

The rest of the day was spent getting this mass of coir to sit in the places where it is needed. You do this in stages, firstly by skewering the scrim into place, then gaining the basic shape with a regulator (a massive blunt needle that you push through the scrim to move the fillings into place) and then Finally with stitches to pull the stuffings toward the edges to give you a firm border.

 

Can you see what we’re doing now? Skewers are perfect for temporary fitting

New to me today were ‘oblique stitches’ which flattened down the inner walls of the well, giving them the required slope toward the outside of the frame. This angle means that the soft fillings that sit within the well won’t all of a sudden finish where the firmer pad begins, instead there will be a gradual move toward a firmer feel as you work from the inside toward the edge. Clever eh? Working these stitches was incredibly satisfying as it changed the shape instantaneously.

 

The irony of a blurry photo showing a sharpening shape! These oblique stitches changed the shape immediately

The one downside of this kind of work is the physical strength required. Each stitch needs to be pulled tight with some force, often around parts of the frame which can make it quite uncomfortable – and that’s without the constant pull of twine on your fingers! I’m pleased that the next bit of stitching will now be tomorrow. I’m a delicate soul.

Today’s end point – all achieved with traditional methods

Darren’s made a batch of pasties today while I’ve been doing this, so Cornish treats await me in the cottage – I do hope my sore hands can hold them 😉

A couple of fun projects

Oh Hi! It’s been a while eh? I’ve just shocked myself a little in seeing that my last post was September – so what’s been going on?

Well I’ve had a few commissions which is lovely, I’ve settled into my new studio and I’m loving the extra space, I was shortlisted for an upholstery scholarship with the Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust (yay!) and didn’t get it (what’s the opposite of yay?), I bought a fancy-pants new sewing machine that will stop me from crying when someone asks me about velvet, oh, and I had a month in Australia! Does that let me off the hook for being absent?

I’m going to write a bit more about some of this stuff, particularly the scholarship (I met the Crown Jeweller – check me out), but today I wanted to share a couple of little fun projects with you…….

The starting point
The starting point

At present I have a shed full of furniture, little projects waiting in the wings for my own experimentation and amusement, but this was the one I was most keen to complete. I really like the idea that one day I will run some short workshops locally, a kind of “come and make one of these in 3 sessions!” type of thing and with that in mind, I thought I’d have a go at an upcycling project that could be the ‘one of these’ that people make…… a footstool made from an old electrical spool, or spool-stool if you like?

The finished stool
The finished stool

With a decent amount of the lovely Abbotsford wool left over from my Ercol project, I thought this little stool would be the perfect accompaniment. What do you think?

IMG_5098

The second project speaks volumes about my love of the South West. I picked up this souvenir tea towel in Falmouth, but it was never destined for cups and saucers. With some plain white fabric and a piped edge, it’s made three lovely bolster cushions that remind me of sunny days. Perfect for these dark January days.

          IMG_5116          IMG_5111

Thanks for the velvet tips

I’m clearly a glutton for punishment as I’m contemplating another velvet project. You may remember my first attempt with velvet but if you dont, let’s just say it turned out fine, but there was some pain along the way! I’ve been given this gorgeous little 30’s chair and I can’t help thinking that a rich yellow / mustard velvet would look simply amazing (and bang on-trend too). What do you reckon?

30's chair

Anyway, as I brace myself in preparation I had to share with you a short email that dropped into my inbox the other day….

Date: 11 August 2014 16:42:12 BST
To:enquiries@thecantinpatch.co.uk
Subject: Thanks for velvet tips

Hi Jon,

I just wanted to say thanks heaps for sharing your despair when you were sewing striped velvet seat cushions. I was in that same place, frustrated and close to tears when I googled and found your blog. I laughed lots and quickly went to buy a walking foot. Velvet, though still temperamental, is sewing beautifully now. Thanks again.

Coral
From Australia

I was so delighted that someone had taken the time to let me know that my account of working with the world’s most volatile fabric (I’m being slightly dramatic) had helped them in their velvet hour of need (which sounds equally dramatic) …… and not only that, on the other side of the world!

This certainly put a big smile on my face and made me feel like I’d done a good deed for the week. I’d say it’s also helped me to feel 20% more brave (not a scientific measurement) and ready to give velvet another go …… thanks Coral!